Princess V62

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Princess V62

Author : Barry Tyler

INVINCIBLE

There is an old and often egotistical colloquialism that suggests you can’t improve on perfection. Maybe so, but Princess Yachts International has certainly given the theory a gentle ‘nudge’ with its latest model release, the Princess V62 V-Class Sports Yacht.

 

Princess sports yachts are certainly viewed by the discerning around our planet, as one of the must-have fashion accessories every well-to-do businessman should be seen with, but despite opposition from the likes of Azumits, Sunseekers and Fairlines in that regard, Princess Yachts International’s R&D team have graphically confirmed with this latest V62 model that they are not about to sit on their thumbs and watch the opposition float past. Their ambitious plan is for their company to be the market leader in this highly competitive sector of the market.

And if you want tangible confirmation of this commitment, it is perhaps best quantified by the fact that at the recent annual Motor Boat of the Year awards, the V62 won the coveted ‘Boat of the Year’ title in the ‘Sports Cruiser’ category. Judges described it as “close to Sports Cruiser heaven” courtesy of its spacious accommodation, quiet operation and impressive performance and handling attributes.

Okay, so what is different with this latest release from the respected British manufacturer? First and foremost, the most obvious aspect was the sheer volume of this boat. The attention to detail too, was evident the moment I stepped aboard, with the massive hydraulic rise and fall swim platform (all hydraulic systems aboard are Opacmere) providing the mandatory entry access for the tender in the garage, plus it was also a great area­­­ for swimmers and snorkelers and if you so desired, the perfect place to mount a jet-ski cradle.

Immediately forward of this platform was another typically sport-yacht style of feature, the hydraulically-operated transom beam assembly which lifted to reveal the garage which was capable of accepting an up to 3.2 5m waterjet-powered tender, or a 3m outboard-powered RIB. And of course, what Euro-style sport yacht would be complete without the mandatory aft facing sun-lounge atop this beam.

To the left side of the transom beam was a set of steps which led up onto the generously-wide walkways to the fore deck. Walkways incidentally which were teak-covered and adorned with appropriately placed grab rails and a nice sturdy bow-rail assembly – which made the walk to the bow anchoring features or the second sun-lounger mounted on the cabin top, a safe and pleasurable experience for the ladies especially. Entry to the cockpit was up steps on the starboard side of this beam, on the way passing the very robust anchoring bollard and cleat moulded into each topside corner, and, the best example of a transom gate I have ever seen. It was neat the way this was recessed into the wall of the cockpit.

The Entertainer

The lifestyle theme was continued with the entertainer-style outdoor ‘setting’ which included the forward facing lounge (a continuation if you like of the sun-lounge feature) which was an integral part of a U-shaped lounge around an impressive and more importantly appropriately-sized portside teak table. An outside galley module was to starboard, complete with electric BBQ, refrigeration and sink with hot and cold water.

A sedan style of vessel, the cockpit ‘flowed’ eloquently through onto the upper saloon level courtesy of overlapping saloon ‘pulldoors’ which neatly secreted themselves back into the portside bulkhead, so as to provide a full two-door-wide entranceway. Décor was definitely the contemporary look on this level for the European square-look of the light oak woodwork was nicely complemented by (chocolate-coloured) helm seats, a contrasting cream-coloured lounge to portside, plush padded feature, wall and ceiling panels, ‘planked’ wooden floors and slim-line venetian blinds which nicely privatised the upper saloon level.

Every bit the opulent yet still entirely ambient ‘entertainer’ level here also, features included a starboard-side full length wall unit complete with mandatory electrically-operated rise and fall Samsung television, a neat deep-gloss table be-fitting the full-length portside lounge, and a portside bulkhead storage locker for incidentals. Completing the ‘sports’ picture was a stupendous-sized overhead ‘easy-operation’ electric sun-roof, complete with four fixed windows moulded into it, which had to be seen to be believed; brilliant, day or night! The helm was very succinct – without imposing on the ambience and entertainment value of this level. Two magnificent chairs offered not only a most comfortable, ergonomic driving position, with everything at your fingertips, but also very good 360-degree visibility. As you would expect, it was very well spec’d too, with an integrated Furuno radar, plotter and GPS navigational package, Raymarine ST60+ depth and wind gauges, bow- and stern-thruster controls, and Sleipner helm.

Conveniently, the electronic Caterpillar remote engine controls along with the trim tab activators and the VHF, were off to the starboard side – right at the skipper’s finger-tips! A nice touch too, was the array of grab handles about this level, all purposefully placed so you could move about this upper level, safely and deftly! Putting the helm seat base to good use, a Vitrifrigo fridge and icemaker combo was moulded into the saloon side of this module.

Multi-faceted Below Decks

Unusual in that while it was essentially a single-level sedan style of vessel from outward appearances, the generously high but entirely in proportion topsides allowed the in-house Princess design team to also incorporate a rather unique lower saloon and accommodation level akin to what you might find on a much, much larger vessel.

Moulded steps led down to a well lit, well ventilated area. The galley was to portside of what was a surprisingly large room, designed purposefully so the galley and dining settings were cleverly separated. The L-shaped galley featured a sensibly sized sink, generous bench space, an opening porthole above, a nicely secreted upright house-size refrigerator and freezer combo, a four-burner electric stove, extractor fan, opening porthole, Panasonic convection microwave, dishwasher and plenty of cupboards and drawers for storage.

The L-shaped dining setting was opposite and forward of the galley, with seating for five on a leather lounge surrounding the striking solid wood table. A most pleasant setting, the contemporary look certainly combined admirably well with the alcove style (opening) portholes behind, which offered good light and ventilation. This ventilation aspect especially impressed me for while of course Cruisair air-conditioning was provided as standard, 24.9kW (85,000 BTU/h) of it in fact, there is nothing quite like natural air ventilation.

Granted this was a 19-metre boat, but I was still more than impressed with not only the features here, but also the space allocation devoted to the galley and dining setting – plus each of the bedrooms – plus the bathroom – plus the laundry that was secreted into the base of the stair module. On most boats this lower level would be nothing more than a companionway; here we had the whole nine yards yet nothing compromised or impinged on the other.

Accommodation aboard the V62 was generous, and again very much followed the contemporary ‘square’ look and décor of the two saloons. Each room had full-length hanging wardrobes, recessed alcoves with wooden venetian blinds, opening portholes, good wall and overhead lighting, bedside tables, mosquito screens where applicable, feature head-boards, and plenty of cupboard and storage provision. All available space was in fact, very well utilised for this most important of facets. Our Princess provided accommodation for six people, in three bedrooms. The forward VIP stateroom in the bow featured a queen-size island berth and was the only room which featured both an overhead opening hatch, and overhead pigeon-locker storage. The twin-single cabin was immediately to starboard at the bottom of the stair module and while the berths were twin single, it would obviously transform into a double room if you so desired; I preferred it just as it was!

Accommodation aboard the V62 was generous, and again very much followed the contemporary ‘square’ look and décor of the two saloons. Each room had full-length hanging wardrobes, recessed alcoves with wooden venetian blinds, opening portholes, good wall and overhead lighting, bedside tables, mosquito screens where applicable, feature head-boards, and plenty of cupboard and storage provision. All available space was in fact, very well utilised for this most important of facets. Our Princess provided accommodation for six people, in three bedrooms. The forward VIP stateroom in the bow featured a queen-size island berth and was the only room which featured both an overhead opening hatch, and overhead pigeon-locker storage. The twin-single cabin was immediately to starboard at the bottom of the stair module and while the berths were twin single, it would obviously transform into a double room if you so desired; I preferred it just as it was!

Mechanicals

Having enjoyed the lifestyle side of the Princess V62, all I needed to know then was whether the performance attributes matched the presentation, style and grace this lifestyle-orientated sports yacht was blessed with. Accessed through the forward hatch in the cockpit, space in the engine room was understandably on the tight side, considering the amount of peripheral features and equipment within this room. Unfortunately getting down into this room was a challenge in itself too – I definitely would be changing/modifying the access ladder that was effectively hidden in under the floor – but certainly once down in there, there was a lot to see in this V62 model.

‘Busy’ was the word I was looking for, for as well as the engines there was a 1705-litre fuel tank each side, a garage, crews quarters and a sealed-off utility room for the air-conditioning, battery banks, spare propellers, and the genset which in this instance was upgraded from a 9kW to an Onan 13.5kVA version. Plumbing was also provided in this room, should you decide at a later date to supplement your 500-litre water supply with a desalinator.

The engines were in this instance a pair of 1150hp Caterpillar C18 ACERT diesel engines running through ZF-550A (1.97:1 ratio) gearboxes and conventional shaft drive, to the pair of Veem propellers: Big powerful engines yes, but not the largest available, for while this version powers the V62 to an eyecatching top speed of a shade over 34 knots, you could increase your top speed by upgrading at the time of purchase, to a pair of 1200hp MTU options.

34 knots was a most impressive ‘stat’ however, from a 23-tonne composite GRP hull with a most generous deep-vee hull shape, which evolved from the design pen of international design guru Bernard Olesinski. An underhull shape incidentally, which provided obscenely good handling and cornering characteristics, brilliant acceleration and great ‘down-hill’ directional stability.

Perhaps as a footnote, in my humble opinion (and Princess Australia’s as well), 34 knots from the 1150hp Cats would be more than sufficient to quell the penchant for speed, and especially so when you consider that the 3410 litre fuel payload would only take you 220NM, with the 1200 MTUs at full throttle. It would be damned exciting, sure, especially in any kind of a sea, but not really expected – or needed!

Conclusion

Immediately noticeable was the volume of this boat, compared with previous like models, but the more I perused, the more I discovered changes such as the increased storage potential, more genuinely user-friendly rather than ‘flashy’ features, the hull performance and handling subtleties, and finally with the engines and genset both running, the extra effort that had quite obviously gone into the sound-proofing side of the equation. This was a boat that had everything, Princess Australia had spec’d the boat entirely appropriately for Australian expectations, even down to the personalised Princess china, cutlery and glassware packages – quite simply, it absolutely epitomised lifestyle living. It definitely painted the picture, and sold the sizzle!

Specifications

  • Boat design name: Princess V62 Motor Yacht
  • Year launched: 2010
  • Designer: Bernard Olesinski / Princess Yachts
  • Interior designer: Princess Yachts International
  • Builder: Princess Yachts International
  • LOA: 19.39 metres
  • Beam: 4.99 metres
  • Draft: 1.13 metres
  • Displacement: 23 tonnes
  • Max speed: 34 knots
  • Cruise speed: 20-25 knots
  • Construction: GRP Composite
  • Fuel capacity: 3409 litres
  • Water capacity: 500 litres
  • Engines: 2 x 1150hp Caterpillar C18 ACERT

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