SILENT POWER

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In 1810 Frenchman, Gustave Pierre Trouvé developed a battery engine and adapted it to marine propulsion and introduced to the world, the first electric outboard.

THE 2021 BUYERS GUIDE TO ELECTRIC OUTBOARDS & TROLLING MOTORS 

Ron Czerniak takes a look at what you need to know about electric outboards and trolling motors, including a buyer’s guide to all the models available.

About six years ago, while still working as Asia Pacific Sales Manager for Vetus-Maxwell, I was waiting for a flight home from Hong Kong airport and, with a few hours before the flight, inevitably ended up in one of the airport bookshops. While browsing the shelves, I spotted a title the grabbed my attention. It was the recently published (2015) biography entitled, “Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future”. The book traces Elon Musk’s life from his childhood up to the time he spent at Zip2 and PayPal, and then onto SpaceX, Tesla, and SolarCity.

On my long flight back to Auckland I had pretty much finished reading the book and started taking an avid interest in electric vehicles. Ironically that interest was prompted further by an excellent documentary film that came out about the same time called Who Killed the Electric Car?  – a 2006 film that explores the creation, limited commercialization, and subsequent destruction of the battery electric vehicle in the United States, specifically the General Motors EV1 of the mid-1990s.

So, when Barry Thompson asked me to write an article about electric trolling motors and electric outboard engines I was excited, but somewhat daunted, by the task ahead. Although I have read a lot about Electric Vehicles (EV’s), watched You Tube clips and driven a few pure battery electric vehicles (BEV’s), Hybrids (powered by a conventional engine, an electric motor and a hybrid battery) and PHEV – plug in hybrids (a vehicle whose battery can be recharged by plugging a charging cable into an external electric power source, in addition to internally by its on-board internal combustion engine-powered generator); I had not thought much about Electric Boats.

Not wanting to write yet another simple comparison guide (albeit the title of this article) which we will get to, I thought to myself; “What do people really know about electric powered vehicles, never mind electric powered boats?” So, I decided to start at the basics, believing that unless one understands the terminology, one cannot appreciate the product and what it can and cannot do. I guess a bit like trying to explain philosophy to you in Greek when you only understand English. So, with apologies to the reader who already knows all this stuff, here we go.

THE TERMINOLOGY

Think of it this way. If you were to discuss a fossil fuel vehicle with just about anyone who has a car, they would probably grasp what you are telling them if you told them your vehicle is a 2.0 litre, 4 cylinder turbo, producing 160 horsepower, has 175 lb.ft of torque, can accelerate from 0 – 60 mph in 10 seconds, has an average fuel consumption of 8 litres/100 kilometres and full tank of fuel may get you from Auckland to Wellington without refueling.

Horsepower, torque, speed, power, fuel consumption – what do all these really mean? Then there is the confusion between Imperial measurement and metric measurement. E.g. miles per gallon (mpg) versus litres per 100 kilometres. Or describing power in horsepower versus kilowatts. Arrrgh!

So, let’s try and make it simple. First of all some basic terms in the imperial and metric systems of measurement.

Force is a push or pull on an object.  In the metric system it is measured in newtons (N) and in the Imperial system, pounds (lb).

Torque is the angular equivalent of force. In the metric system it is measured in newton metres (N.m).  In the Imperial system in pound feet (lb.ft) and is a measure of how much a force acting on an object causes that object to rotate.

Work is what is done when an object is moved.  In the metric system it is measured in joules (J), but more often in kilojoules because a joule is small.  In the Imperial system it is measured in newton metres (yes, same as torque) or ergs or other descriptors.  Work is very closely related to Energy.

Energy is a measure of how much work it takes to do something. In the metric system it is measured in kilowatt hours (kWh).  In the Imperial system in BTUs and otherwise.

Power is the rate at which work is done (or how much energy gets used how quickly). In the metric system it is measured in kilowatts (kW).  In the Imperial system in horsepower (HP).

Thrust, that which makes your boat go, is a force (usually a push), measured in newtons (N) or pounds (lb).  4.45 newtons (0.453775 kilograms force (kgf)) of thrust equals 1 pound of thrust. 1 kilogram of force (kgf) = 2.21 pounds of force (Ibf)      

The Minn Kota trolling motor on the bow of Alloy Boat Magazine’s McLay Fortress gets well used.

Horsepower, first used by Scottish engineer James Watt (yes, that Watt) in the late 18th century, referred to the average performance of a draft horse and is a unit of measure (in the Imperial system) of the amount of power an engine develops, or the rate at which work is done, usually in reference to the output of engines or motors. The definitions of horsepower and kilowatts are similar, with the difference that the Horsepower corresponds to around 0.746 kilowatts. Or, If you prefer, 1 kW = 1.341 HP.

It is important to understand the difference between a kW (a measure of power) and a kWh (a measure of energy). Kilowatt-hours measure energy (e.g. how much charge in a battery) and kilowatt measures power (how quickly the energy in the battery can be used). Since we’re talking about electrical outboards, it’s better that we use kW and kWh since these quantities are most commonly used throughout the electrical world.

If you’ve got a long way to go you need plenty of Energy (kWh or BTUs). If you want to go fast you need plenty of Power (kW or HP).

“But enough, I hear you cry. Tell me about electric trolling motors and electric marine outboard engines!” Okay, but keep the following relative things in mind when comparing products.

 

Fuel Tank              =      Batteries

Litres of Fuel       =      kWh of power available

1 Horsepower      =      0.75 kW (approximately)

 

Therefore, you may surmise that if a fossil fuel boat holds 100 litres and you burn 2 litres an hour at 10 knots; on a full tank you can run for 50 hours or 500 nm.

An electric powered boat is very similar. If you know your boat has 100 kWh of full battery on board and you use 2kw an hour at 10 knots; on a full battery you can run for 50 hours or 500 nm (assuming 100% efficiency).

Torqeedo’s range of electric outboards have between 2-3hp of thrust.

BATTERIES (FUEL):

The number of electric motoring hours depends on your battery bank combined with any generated capacity (from solar, wind or other sources). According to Mastervolt, for six to eight hours of operation, you need 4.6 times the motor’s power output in kWh. Example: 4.6 x 3.5 kW = 16.1 kWh; this is the battery capacity required for six to eight hours of e-powering.

When shopping for a battery, there are four main categories:

Flooded lead acid: most affordable are 6V deep cycle batteries, often used in an electric golf cart, with a typical capacity of 200-250Ah. They are economical and are built for deep discharges. They need to be mounted upright and receive regular addition of distilled water. They also emit hydrogen gas when recharging. Not the most desirable option!

AGM batteries: are fully sealed, maintenance-free, handle high recharging current and can be mounted in any position. Relatively inexpensive, but won’t provide the “grunt” and capacity of Lithium-Ion batteries.

Gel cells: are sealed, maintenance free, with a long lifespan allowing a large number of charging and discharging cycles. They are excellent as a service battery for medium and large systems.

Lithium-ion: batteries are top quality but most expensive, with highly advanced technology. They have a high energy density and are perfect for deep cycling applications. Compared to traditional lead-acid batteries, Lithium-ion batteries offer savings of up to 70 % in volume and weight, while the number of charging cycles is three or more times as large.

 

To use an example, a 55 lb thrust motor unit has a peak power draw of 40 amps. If you use the trolling motor for 6 hours at average 50% load of 20 amps, the trolling motor will then require a battery load of 120 Ah (20 amps x 6 hours = 120 Ah). Amps are simply the amount of electricity used by an item. Volts are the measure of the force of the electric. Amps x volts = the total wattage (workload – expressed in watts (W) or kilowatts (kW).

Remote control units make operating an electric thruster a much easier task.

The size of an electric trolling motor is determined by power output, which in the case means electric motors with 0.5 to 4 kW direct current (DC) output, operated at 12 to 60 volts DC. These systems have the propeller fixed directly to the motor, which is mounted in the lower unit under water. This setup limits the power output but makes them ideal for trolling engines.

A typical 12 volts rating battery has a capacity of 48 Ah. It means that when fully charged, the battery can deliver one amp for 48 hours, two amps for 24 hours, etc. So depending on how many amps your motor uses will dictate how long the battery will last before being discharged.

But the more current the motor draws, the lower the capacity of the battery. E.g. for a given battery, if the motor draws 3.9 Amps, it may fully discharge in about an hour, whereas if it draws 32.5 Amps, it may only last four minutes.

If you are using an electric outboard as the main engine, the disadvantage is the limited range due to the weight and size of the batteries. Lead-acid batteries have high weight (38 watt hours / kilogram) and limited capacity when quickly discharged (60% at 1 hour). Newer battery technologies like lithium systems (e.g. LiFePO4 or Lithium polymer) offer up to seven times the performance of a lead-acid battery, but they are very expensive. However, as battery technology improves almost geometrically every year, the cost of these preferable batteries continues to decrease.

Aquawatt electric outboards range from 20hp to 70hp.

CHARGING METHODS

Charging an outboard or trolling motor battery is, by in large, similar to charging an electric vehicle battery. However, the big difference is that it is more than likely that you will be charging your trolling motor at home after a day out fishing and your outboard battery in a similar fashion or with the use of a generator, main engine charging (as for house and start batteries on board your launch) for example, and sometimes supplemented by solar energy using solar panels. Suffice it to say, that the batteries will need to be charged as they near empty, just as your outboard motor fuel tank will need to be re-filled after a day out on the water.       

ELECTRIC OUTBOARDS AND TROLLING MOTORS

Electric outboard motors for boat propulsion have developed over the years into three distinct categories, trolling, outboard and main (inboard). Here we will focus on the first two.

The advantages of electric boat propulsion systems, be they a trolling, outboard or main engine is that they are low maintenance, inexpensive to run, almost noiseless and emission-free.

This article is written and presented in a comparative format to give the reader updated information, with the above background terminology to better understand the information in regards to what is available on today’s market. Hopefully it will enable you to make the best informed choice as to the most suitable option/budget to meet your needs, whether for a small dingy, larger trailer boat or as an auxiliary trolling motor used in conjunction with the main propulsion engine.

In 1810 Frenchman, Gustave Pierre Trouvé developed a battery engine and adapted it to marine propulsion and introduced to the world, the first electric outboard; a small 5 kilogram unit which he used to facilitate the transport of the marine propulsion system between his workshop and the Seine. Technically he had just invented the world’s first outboard motor, although it would take Ole Evinrude many years later, in 1907, to develop the first commercially successful outboard.

On May 26, 1881, a prototype of a 5m long electric outboard powered boat was built by Trouvé and baptised “The Phone”, reached a speed of 9 km/h. Its innovative features were the electro-magnets made of soft iron and tempered steel.  With his larger, recently developed, batteries, Trouvé used a propeller placed in a false mobile rudder sometimes in front, sometimes behind. “It’s the rudder including the propelling unit and its engine, forming a movable whole, easily removable from the boat…” This “gouvernail moteur propulseur” was the first outboard engine (electric or otherwise) in the world.

Electric outboards have been slow to develop, but in recent years there has been a renewed interest due to their clean, green environmental acceptable image. Many lakes around the world – Lake Pupuke in Auckland for example – ban traditional petroleum-based power. There are two types of electric outboards, the ones used as the main propulsion unit and hung on the transom and then there are the thrusters or trolling motors, which are more likely to be found hanging from the bow.

While there are dozens of brands available, especially out of China, when it comes to the ‘traditional’ style electric ‘outboard’, the main players are Aquawatt, Elco, ePropulsion, Evoy, Haswing, Vision, Minn Kota, MotorGuide and Torqueedo. Each offers a range of electric engines, with or without integrated batteries and they range from 1hp (0.746 kW) to 80hp (60 kW). There have been larger horsepower electric outboards promoted over recent years, but it is only just recently that they have gotten into mainstream production.

It is now commonplace to see boats, alloy especially, with a trolling motor sitting along the foredeck. Many alloy manufacturers even have a dedicated mount as a standard feature on some of their models. If you are looking at installing a trolling motor on the bow, you firstly need a flat mounting plate, but also you will have to eliminate or dramatically change your bow rails. The predominant brands are Minn Kota, Motorguide, Watersnake, Haswing, and several of the above mentioned electric boat motor manufacturers.

ePropulson’s Spirit 1.0 easily matches a 3-hp petrol outboard, providing sufficient propulsion for a 3m tender.

So, having thought you’d like to get some sort of electric outboard motor, there are still batteries to be considered. In terms of a petrol unit, think perhaps of a small four metre tinny with a 50 hp petrol outboard hanging off the stern. The motor still has to be connected to a fuel source (think bright red 100 litre portable tank nestled in the stern of the boat) for a larger motor, or incorporated into the engine housing of a dinghy motor for example.

Same goes for an electric outboard, but now you need a battery or batteries. On some smaller trolling motors, the rechargeable battery is incorporated into the motor housing. However, others are connected to a battery located in the stern of the boat, much like a petrol outboard fuel tank.

So, now instead of thinking petrol fuel tanks, we need to start thinking batteries.

Unlike an electric outboard, most of which come with an integrated battery, trolling motors generally get their power externally – though increasingly the battery is part of the motor. It is a good idea to have a separate battery as a back-up when possible, as electric outboards do consume plenty of power when continuously used.

TROLLING MOTORS

It is the trolling market that has done a lot to promote electric outboard power and none more so than in the recreational fishing market. While they have been mainstream on every Bass boat in the US for years, it’s only recently that we have seen a swing to trolling motors on locally built boats. While they have been more common on boats under about 5.5m, manufacturers are now offering extra-long shafts which are suitable for larger trailer boats. For example, both Motorguide and Minn Kota have models with 1.52m and 1.82m lengths.

A trolling motor is an awesome addition to anyone’s fishing ‘box’. With wireless GPS remotes and constant, quiet power, trolling motors are a great weapon to improve your fishing.

The choice in New Zealand is limited to a handful of leading brands, Minn Kota, MotorGuide, Haswing, ePropulsion, Torqeedo and Watersnake. Check out the internet, and you will find plenty more, such as Parsun, Temo and a myriad of other brand names you may never have heard of, but locally they might not yet be available.

While Minn Kota, MotorGuide, Torqeedo and Watersnake dominate the market, you have plenty of choices (refer comparative chart below), but make sure you know what you are buying and is there any back-up or service? When you do decide on what brand of trolling motor to buy, make sure it is suitable for your boat. Things to consider might not only be the weight of the unit but where it is going to be mounted, the static thrust output (more thrust = more power) and the shaft length. If the shaft is too short when fully extended it may spend its time with the prop on the surface and its ability to perform and add ‘bite’ underwater will be negated.

The Haswing Ultima’s unique vertical battery mount design creates an extremely compact outboard.

There are also different mounting options when it comes to the controls. You have the basic manual operation which is common in the smaller units, foot operated which is designed for use on the casting deck, or the more sophisticated ones with GPS with the control hanging on a lanyard around your neck or by using an app on your smart phone.

It is now commonplace to see boats, alloy especially, with a trolling motor sitting along the foredeck. Many alloy manufacturers even have a dedicated mount as a standard feature on some of their models. If you are looking at installing a trolling motor on the bow, you firstly need a flat mounting plate, but also you will have to eliminate or dramatically change your bow rails.

The size of an electric trolling outboard is determined by power output, which in the case of a trolling outboard is electric motors with 0.5 to 4 kW direct current (DC) output, operated at 12 to 60 volts DC. These systems have the propeller fixed directly to the electric motor, which is mounted in the lower unit under water. This setup limits the power output but makes them ideal for trolling engines.

Bow or Stern

Bow mounted motors are convenient if you fish primarily in an open bow rider or from a casting deck. If you have a casting deck, then foot-operated controls are the perfect option. As you will often be operating in very shallow water or close to reefs, most motors have, a spring-loaded mount that allows the motor to swing away on impact, to prevent damage from groundings. On very small craft the trolling motor often doubles as an auxiliary engine and is mounted on the transom where it is operated by a tiller. Transom-mount motors also feature brackets that adjust to different angles and heights so the motor’s shaft is immersed at the right depth.

Vision Marine technologies has released an all-electric 180hp outboard.

The standard shaft length is about 120 cm. To determine the right length for your boat, measure the distance from where the shaft is mounted on the deck or the transom to the water and then add 40cm to 55cm depending on the manufacturers recommendation. Moto Guide suggests adding 40cm and Minn Kota 51cm for example.

If you are operating in rough water longer shafts are recommended, so the prop stays about 15cm below the surface when the boat pitches and rolls. You can fine-tune the motor’s vertical position with the adjustment on the mount.

As most trolling motors are manufactured in the US, they are rated in pounds of thrust. A rule of thumb to go by is 1 HP = about 22 lbf (10 kgf) of thrust. Therefore 2.5 HP is equivalent to about 55 lbf of thrust. The simplified equation for power is: the higher the voltage, the higher the thrust. E.g. 12v – 55lb (25kg) / 24v – 80lb (36kg) / 36v – 109lb (48kg). The Minn Kota Ulterra offering 112lb. (50kg) of thrust, powerful enough to move heavy vessels such as pontoon boats.

When it comes to size, bigger is almost always better. Larger boats need more juice, but then you should also consider the type of water conditions you will predominately use the trolling motor in, with consideration given for wave action, wind and current. Erring on the stronger side has its benefits because stronger motors run more efficiently at lower speeds and provide a safety cushion for handling the different conditions. The general rule of thumb when it comes to thrust is that you will need at least 2 lbs (0.91 kg) of thrust for every 100 lb (45 kg) of fully loaded boat weight (people and gear included). When wind and current are major factors, you’ll want a little extra thrust. Think about the size of your boat, how much battery capacity you can safely install to satisfy the energy demands of a trolling motor, and whether or not you will be able to charge the batteries when underway.

Norwegian company Evoy say their electric outboards will be available as 150 HP, 300 HP and 450 HP.

A 24V model with 55lb. (25kg.) of thrust may only draw 28A, while the 12V model with 44lb. (20kg.) of thrust can draw 36A. In general, larger motors require more battery capacity, and if you fish from dawn to dusk with a boat of 5m or longer, you’ll probably want 24V. Serious anglers who spend a lot of time on the water will appreciate a 36V motor. A spare is always a good idea.

MAIN (OUTBOARD) ENGINES

Unlike the trolling motors (measured in static thrust) that can only go at slow trolling speed, true electric outboard motors can provide much higher power. They are designed to be used as the primary power source.

Recently developed outboard motors powered with an alternating current (AC) or DC electric motor in the power head like a conventional petrol engine, mean, a motor can produce 10kW output or more and is able to replace a petrol engine of 15hp or more.

Here is a table that shows the estimated range and runtime of a typical 6 hp (4.5 kW) electric outboard at different speed levels with a single full charge of one 9 kWh battery on a 12 ft (4 m) aluminium boat.

Power(kW)     Speed(mph)   Runtime (hh:mm)      Range (mile)

0.5                   4                      18:00                           72

1                      5                      9:00                             45

2                      6.7                   4:30                             30.2

3                      8                      3:00                             24

4                      11.5                 2:15                             25.9

5                      13.5                 1:50                             24.7

6                      15                    1:30                             22.5

Some electric outboard engines are built based on existing outboard legs with the motor on top and a vertical shaft transmitting the power to a lower gear box. The advantage of this setup is the accessibility of the motor and to have all electrics above the waterline. The disadvantage is a somewhat lower efficiency due to the gearbox. These outboard engines allow much larger electric motors and mostly use standard outboard parts (like propeller etc.).

The disadvantage is the limited range due to the weight and size of the batteries. Lead-acid batteries have high weight (38 watt hours/kilogram) and limited capacity when quickly discharged (60% at 1 hour). Newer battery technologies like lithium systems (e.g. LiFePO4 or Lithium polymer) offer up to seven times the performance of a lead-acid battery, but they are very expensive.

For longer trips, the system can have a range-extending generator, which recharges the batteries, but this is only possible in larger boats.

There is a lot of development in the area of electric outboards as the main power, with companies such as the German based Aqua Watt currently developing a 20hp (15 kW) outboard. Aqua Watt electric outboards are suitable to be used with either lead-acid batteries up to 10kW output or with lithium batteries up to 42 kW (57 hp) output and a potential maximum speed of 30 knots on a typical water-ski boat. The outboard motor is water cooled and equipped with a digital controller providing a fully automatic adjustment to the power demand of your boat. The company has also developed an electric outboard motor with an output of up to 40hp on made to order special versions.

In conclusion, to figure out what you need for your particular vessel, consider what we’ve discussed in this article, study the comparative chart below, talk to people who have been using electric boat motors and, within your budget constraints, pick the electric motor that suits you the best and start enjoying low maintenance, inexpensive, almost noiseless and emission-free power boating.

TROLLING MOTORS   All have remote battery supply 
HASWING   
MODELShaft Voltage/Thrust (lbs)Type
Cayman B54″/58″ Adjustable12v (55lbs)/24v (80lbs)Fresh/Salt
Cayman B GPS54″/60″/72″ 12v (55lbs)/24v (80lbs)Fresh/Salt
Cayman Pro54″/58″ Adjustable12v (55lbs)/24v (80lbs)Fresh/Salt
MINN KOTA   
MODELShaft Voltage/Thrust (lbs)Type
Edge36″/45″/52″12v – (45lbs)/(55lbs) 24v – (70lbs)Freshwater
PowerDrive/Riptide 48″/54″60″12v – (45lbs)/(55lbs) 24v – (70lbs)Fresh/Salt
Pontoon48″/52″12v – (55lbs) 24v – (70lbs)Freshwater
Maxxum/Riptide 45″/52″24v – (80lbs) 36v – (112lbs)Fresh/Salt
Fortex/Riptide45″/52″24v – (80lbs) 36v – (112lbs)Fresh/Salt
Vantage31″ Adjustable24v – (80lbs) 36v – (101lbs)Freshwater
Terrova/Riptide 45″/54″/60″/72″24v – (80lbs) 36v – (112lbs)Fresh/Salt
Ulterra/Riptide45″/60″/72″24v – (80lbs) 36v – (112lbs)Fresh/Salt
Ultrex45″/60″/72″24v – (80lbs) 36v – (112lbs)Freshwater
MOTORGUIDE   
MODELShaft Voltage/Thrust (lbs)Type
Tour Pro 45″24v (82lb) / 36v (109lb)Freshwater
Tour45″24v (82lb) / 36v (109lb)Freshwater
Xi5 Wireless 48″/54″/60″/72″12v (55lb) / 24v (80lb) / 36v (105lb)Freshwater
Xi5 Wireless 48″/54″/60″/72″12v (55lb) / 24v (80lb) / 36v (105lb)Saltwater
Xi3 Wireless  36″/48″/54″/60″12v (45lb)/ 12v (55lb) / 24v (70lb)Freshwater
Xi3 Wireless 54″/60″12v (55lb)/24v (70lb)Saltwater
Xi3 Kayak 36″12v (55lb)Freshwater
X3 36″/45″/50″12v (45lb) 12v (55lb) 24v (70lb)Freshwater
R5 Digital42″/50″12v (80lb) 24v (105lb)Fresh/Salt
R330″/36″/42″12v (40lb) 12v (45lb) 12v (55lb)Fresh/Salt
WATERSNAKE   
MODELShaft Voltage/Thrust (lbs)Type
ASP Transom24″12v (18lb)Fresh/Salt
ASP T1824″12v (18lb)Fresh/Salt
ASP T2424″12v (24lb)Fresh/Salt
ASP 24LB Transom24″12v (24lb)Fresh/Salt
Venom SXW 3436″12V (34lb)Fresh/Salt
Venom SXW 4436″12V (44lb)Fresh/Salt
Venom SXW 5436″12V (54lb)Fresh/Salt
Venom SXW 6536″12v (65lb)Fresh/Salt
Fierce SWRF 5448″12V (54lb)Fresh/Salt
Hawser48″12v (54lb)Fresh/Salt
Geo Spot GPS54″12v (65lb)Fresh/Salt

OUTBOARDS

AQUAWATT

SHAFT LENGTH (“)

Voltage/Thrust Power (lbs)

Type

Green Power

23″

48v (252lbs to 333lbs) Lithium Battery

Fresh/Salt

Green Racing

23″

80v (338lbs) Lithium Battery

Fresh/Salt

Green Thruster

22″

80v (560lbs to 675lbs) Lithium Battery

Fresh/Salt

Green Flash

22″

144v (477lbs) Lithium Battery

Fresh/Salt

EVOY

SHAFT LENGTH (“)

Voltage/Thrust Power (lbs)

Type

Evoy Pro 150

20″/25″

High Voltage 150hp Equivalent

Fresh/Salt

E-PROPULSION

SHAFT LENGTH (“)

Voltage/Thrust Power (lbs)

Type

Sprit 1.0 Plus

20.7″/24.6″/29.5″

48v (70lbs)

Fresh/Salt

Spirit Evo/Evo R

20.7″/24.6″/29.5″

48v (70lbs)

Fresh/Salt

Navy 3.0 Evo

25.2″/30.1″

48v/(210lbs)

Fresh/Salt

Navy 6.0 Evo

25.2″/30.1″

48v (240lbs)

Fresh/Salt

Navy 6.0 Evo 9.9

25.2″/30.1″

48v (240lbs)

Fresh/Salt

HASWING

SHAFT LENGTH (“)

Voltage/Thrust Power (lbs)

Type

Caymnan T

26″/39″ Adjustable

12v (55lbs)

Fresh/Salt

Protruar G

35″/39″ Adjustable

24v (110lbs)/24v (130lbs)

Fresh/Salt

Ultima

21″/24.5″

29.6v (1100lbs)

Fresh/Salt

Ventura F

21″/24.5″

24v (160lbs)

Fresh/Salt

Armada T

26″

48v (250lbs)/48v (300lbs)

Fresh/Salt

Armada F

26″

48v (250lbs)/48v (300lbs)

Fresh/Salt

Ospian  W20

31″/35″ Adjustable

12v (30lbs)/12v (40lbs)/12v (55lbs)

Fresh/Salt

Comax Transom

Electric Adjustable

12v (55lbs)

Fresh/Salt

MINN KOTA

SHAFT LENGTH (“)

Voltage/Thrust Power (lbs)

Type

Endura

30″/36″/42″

12v (30lbs)/(40lbs)/(45lbs)/(50lbs)/(55lbs)

Fresh

Endura Max

30″/36″/42

12v (40lbs)/(45lbs)/(50lbs)/(55lbs)

Fresh

Traxxis

36″/42″

12v (45lbs)/(55lbs) 24v – (70lbs)/(80lbs)

Fresh

Riptide

36″/42″/52″

12v (45lbs)/(55lbs) 24v/(80lbs) 36v/112lbs)

Fresh

TORQEEDO

SHAFT LENGTH (“)

Voltage/Thrust Power (lbs)

Type

Ultralight 403A

20″

29.6v (70lbs)

Fresh/Salt

Ultralight 403AC

20″

29.6v (70lbs)

Fresh/Salt

Ultralight 1103AC

20″

29.6v (70lbs)

Fresh/Salt

Travel 603S

25″/30″

29.6v (210lbs)

Fresh/Salt

Travel 1103C

25″/30″

29.6v (210lbs)

Fresh/Salt

Cruise 2.0T

25″/30″

24v (115lbs)

Fresh/Salt

Cruise 2.0R

25″/30″

24v (115lbs)

Fresh/Salt

Cruise 4.0T

25″

48v (189lbs)

Fresh/Salt

Cruise 4.0R

25″

48v (189lbs)

Fresh/Salt

Cruise 10.0T

15″/20″/25″

2 x 48v (408lbs)

Fresh/Salt

Cruise 10.0R

15″/20″/25″

2 x 48v (408lbs)

Fresh/Salt

Deep Blue 25R

20″/25″

360v (2800lbs)

Fresh/Salt

Deep Blue 50R

20″/25″

360v (2800lbs)

Fresh/Salt

VISION

SHAFT LENGTH (“)

Thrust Power

Type

E-Motion 180E

25″/30″/35″

High Voltage (110kW) 180hp Equivalent

Fresh/Salt

 

 

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